KidsAudiologist

Archive for the ‘special educational needs’ Category

One in 10 children who survive meningitis are deafened as a result of the illness. Great strides have been made in vaccination for some types of meningitis including the vaccination for Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) which was the biggest cause of meningitis in children under the age of 5 years and a major cause of deafness. The Hib vaccine was introduced in 1992 into the childhood vaccination schedule. However, even after this, hearing problems remain one of the most common after effects of bacterial meningitis.  Other forms of meningitis which are not vaccine preventable, and which pose a significant risk of hearing loss, are group B streptococcal and E coli meningitis, which together account for most cases of meningitis in newborn babies (neonatal meningitis). This means that health professionals working in paediatrics must remain vigilant and refer all babies and children who have had meningitis to audiology for hearing tests, and audiologists must continue to educate their local teams about the risks.

In November 2009 I spoke at the ‘After Meningitis Conference’ in London hosted by the Meningitis Trust on the ‘Impact and Challenges of Hearing Loss Following Meningitis’. I have uploaded the slides below for those that are interested in the facts and figures, and listed the references below.

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Resources, references & further information

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Good toy hearing aids and cochlear implants are hard to come by but some parents have ordered the Build-A-Bear soft hearing aid from the USA. In what has to be the best example of ‘if you don’t ask, you don’t get’ that I’ve seen in a while it’s wonderful to see that Build-A-Bear in the UK are now stocking soft hearing aids for their toys. Sarah Smith, who is the mother of a deaf child and active contributor in the Pimp my hearing aids / cochlear implants UK Facebook group, tweeted the CEB of Build-A-Bear in the USA and as you can see the result was positive and speedy.

So far they have no plans to make a cochlear implant for their teddies so who is going to begin the asking? If you don’t ask…

NDCS are calling on the Department for Education to intervene to protect specialist services for deaf children as a matter of urgency. We know that local authorities are cutting these services to save money, without being transparent about their decisions and actions. These services are not a luxury. They are vital to deaf children’s education, health and wellbeing.

We need 100,000 signatures. Please sign today and share with your friends and family. Thank you.

CLICK TO SIGN HERE!

Protecting specialist services for deaf children

Children in the UK who are clinically suitable candidates and whose family chooses this option for them, have been offered bilateral cochlear implants since 2009. This followed recommendations made by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) who also said that children who had one cochlear implant prior to their guidance being published could be offered a second implant in the other ear (sequential implantation). At the time the evidence base was poor due to the small number of studies and the small numbers of participants, but NICE were persuaded that there were benefits to children having two implants including improved speech understanding in noisy situations, directional perception of sound, easier and less exhausting listening, and prevention of auditory deprivation and impaired development of central pathways by early stimulation of the auditory nerves. Within the guidance NICE recommended further research into the benefits of bilateral cochlear implantation in children and plan to review the evidence and their recommendations in the future.

As a result of this recommendation 15 cochlear implant centres across the UK formed a consortium and agreed on appropriate test procedures to audit the benefit children receive from bilateral cochlear implants. This group now have data from around 900 children and will be presenting their findings at a conference in Southampton on 11th April 2013. The conference is free to attend for adults and parents of children who use cochlear implants, and costs £50 for professionals. The National Paediatric Bilateral Audit website includes more information on the research, some preliminary results and online booking form for the conference.

Having recently joined the iPad revolution I’ve been thinking about apps which might be useful in our day-to-day work. Tina Childress is an Educational Audiologist and keeps a very comprehensive list of Apps for Kids (and Adults) with Hearing Loss. Also, the Apps in Education blog includes a good section on So what’s on the iPad for the kid in your class with a Hearing Impairment? and the Earmeter site includes How an iPad can be an incredibly useful tool for hearing aid practices. But here are a few that I’ve downloaded, had a play with and that I think have the potential to be useful tools in counselling children, young adults and families about the ears and hearing:

Auditory Verbal Price – £2.49
This little app uses sound, pictures and text of the 6 Ling sounds. The Ling sounds are a fantastic daily check for parents to do with their child to check their child’s hearing aids are working properly and that they are picking up the frequency range of speech sounds. You could download a free sheet of the Ling sounds with pictures from The Listening Room but some parents / teachers may like the convenience of having it on their iPad for daily checks.

Hearing Aid TicTacToe Price – £5.99
This is a game for 2-4 players aged 4+ years to help kids develop independence in using and understanding their hearing aids – first by matching pictures, then matching pictures with labels, and finally pictures with function. This app is one the the most expensive I’ve ever purchased but I can see that it could be a really useful tool for audiologists and Teachers of the Deaf that can be used over and over with different cohorts of children and at different times as they develop.

Cochlear Baha Support Price – £free
Love this and want to see many more of them for the various products around. It’s basically a manual for your Baha on your iPad, but because it’s on your iPad you have all the information to hand during the day if something goes wrong and you can troubleshoot it easily. There is also advice on travelling, using the telephone and MRI scans and includes helpful videos to follow on cleaning etc. Brilliant, really useful.

Blue Tree Publishing Price – £1.99 each
Have produced a range of iEducate apps which include animations and video which are really useful for demonstrating how the parts of the ears work. I think I would use this one quite a lot and it’s worth the £1.99. Bluetree have also produced a range of Drag & Drop Identification apps. These are basically jigsaws although I found them quite hard to do and think they might be good revision aids for students. There might also be the older child who is very interested in the ear or science more generally who would enjoy the challenge. I wasn’t sure if the content alone and the fact that you’re unlikely to use it very often was enough to justify the £1.99 each as it becomes quite expensive to get the full set. So try with one and see how you go first. Inner Ear, Middle Ear and Labyrinth all available.

Draw MD ENT Price – £free
At it’s most basic this is a lovely tool for showing an older child, teenager and family more about the workings of the ear. It gives some really nice detailed pictures of the ear that you can draw on with your finger to highlight parts as you discuss the anatomy and cause of hearing loss etc with them. At it’s most impressive, you can use your own photos which I’m sure ENT surgeons would find useful for showing patients photographs of their own ears. You can add labels and even email the finished picture to the patient if they want it!

Hearing Loss Simulator Price – £2.49
I think this app has the potential to be a great counselling tool for use with families. There are graphics to show where the common sounds, speech, and individual speech sounds are located for loudness and frequency, and there are lots of options in terms of audiogram configurations. All the recorded voices have an American accent but it is possible to record your own voice for use in simulations.

Play it down Price – £free
Pick a song from your library and crank up the age dial for a feel of what music may sound like in the future. It’s a bit gimmiky but it could be a useful tool in couselling teenagers about the potential effects of noise damage.

Relaxing Sounds of Nature Price £0.69 (lite version free)
Finally, there are masses of nature sound apps out there to choose from. I really like this one as it has a really large range of sounds to choose from, you can mix sounds to your taste, and there’s some beautiful pictures of scenary to accompany the sounds. It also includes a variety of white/pink noise to choose from. I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend this one to my tinnitus patients (and anyone else who wants to relax!)

Families who have a child with a mild, moderate or unilateral deafness frequently report that their child’s needs are poorly understood. This is often because the effect of their hearing loss may be more subtle than for those children with a more severe hearing loss. For example a mainstream teacher will find the child can hear them fine when working one-to-one with the child and not appreciate that the they can’t hear voices from further away and when there is background noise. This means that children have very reduced opportunities to benefit from hearing what is going on around them – incidental learning – and are therefore more likely to show delays in speech, language, educational, & social development than their normally hearing peers. Sadly, due to funding and capacity issues, local specialist support resources are often prioritised towards those children with more severe hearing losses so that training and awareness in schools may be low. Parents understanding and advocating for their child’s needs becomes even more important.
In 2010, NDCS was awarded a 2 year grant from the Department for Education under the SEN and Disability “Improving Outcomes” theme. We have been working with parents and professionals, providing specialist information and support on key barriers to achievement and to specific groups with a significant attainment gap. One strand of this work that I’ve been involved with has been to provide new information resources for parents that are available free to download – ‘Mild deafness’ and ‘Unilateral deafness’. This weekend I was involved in developing our first weekend for families of children who have a mild, moderate or unilateral deafness. All the deaf children were between 3 and 7 years old and they and their siblings appeared to have a great time occupied in the children’s activities sesssions. Parents attended sessions sharing their experiences, and heard from a young adult role model who grew up with moderate hearing loss in both ears. They also attended information sessions on audiology, technology, education, and NDCS events and services. 12 families attended and for 10 of them it was the first time they or their children had ever attended an NDCS event. Many had been told or held the perception that their child wasn’t ‘deaf enough’ to access specialist services, Disability Living Allowance, resources that help children develop listening skills, and even NDCS. A few families had shown an interest in learning sign language to help communication at times when their hearing aids couldn’t be used and to mix with other deaf children, but many had been poorly advised including that it would have a negative impact on their child’s spoken language development. This may have been one dimension of why families often hadn’t persued joining local groups and meeting other families with deaf children. Most of the children had never met another child that uses hearing aids and it was a real joy watching them playing together and making new friends ‘like them’ over the weekend. I believe the parents have all gone away feeling more confident that they understand their child’s needs and will be better able to make informed choices on behalf of and with their child.

So if you have a child with a mild, moderate or unilateral deafness remember that “NDCS uses the word ‘deaf’ to refer to all levels of hearing loss” and that all of our current services and events are open to you.

#FollowFriday (or #FF) is a way of recommending interesting and/or helpful people on Twitter to your followers. For more information on using #FollowFriday well see @SLPTanya‘s excellent blog. I find Twitter really valuable and struggle to narrow down my recommendations to just a handful each week, risking cluttering up everyone’s timelines! So I’ve had a browse through my favourites and have come up with a list of those Twitter accounts that I most often save tweets from. I’ve also included links to their websites for those readers who aren’t Twitter users.

So for really useful audiology content (in no particular order) here are my #FollowFriday’s:

For wonderful #AudPeeps (audiologists and other professionals interested in hearing care) who are always happy to tweet/chat my #FollowFriday’s are:


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