KidsAudiologist

Archive for the ‘single-sided deafness SSD’ Category

Yesterday I attended the launch of the new National Commissioning Framework for Hearing Loss Services.

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This is a document was developed by members of the Hearing And Deafness Alliance (a group of representatives from professional organisations, charity sector and patient groups) with NHS England and follows the launch of the Government’s cross-sector and cross-departmental Action Plan on Hearing Loss last year.

The new framework is aimed at supporting NHS commissioners in ensuring they understand the importance of services for people with hearing loss and the potential impact of un-managed hearing and communication difficulties. The document clearly indicates that it covers the whole age range from birth onwards but understandably given the much larger numbers involved, does have some emphasis on age-related hearing loss. But section 3.1 does make it clear that CCGs should be familiar with their commissioning responsibilities in relation to hearing and wider audiology services and appendix 3 helpfully clarifies the responsibilities of CCGs, NHS England and PHE in the complex environment of commissioning the various parts of a child’s audiology journey. Finally, section 8 stresses the need to move towards more outcome based commissioning and the crucial role of service specifications in setting out the key requirements for delivery of the service.

I was therefore very pleased be invited onto the Children’s Services Content Group and to lead on developing a model service specification for commissioners on paediatric audiology services along with a series of suggested outcome measures for children plus service performance outcomes, that services and commissioners can use to measure quality of the service. A link to this document is contained within the Framework or can be downloaded here. This is the first time we have had children’s outcomes used as commissioning measures of quality and we look forward to feedback and developing these further.

I’m now looking forward to working with NDCS colleagues to share this suite of documents widely with our networks, including service professionals and commissioners.

 

 

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Atresia or microtia is the absence or underdevelopment of the outer ear and is frequently associated with other craniofacial conditions that may impact on all aspects of their lives. It is essential that these patients and their families have access to specialised microtia teams able to provide up to date and unbiased information. A multidisciplinary approach should be taken to provide holistic, individualised assessments and interventions. This should encompass cosmetic, audiological and psychological aspects of their care. Close liaison between local services and the ear reconstruction team is a key component to achieving the best outcomes for these patients. There is a recognised need for agreed care standards for these patients, and this document aims to reflect a consensual view of how this care can be provided in an integrated fashion.

I was pleased to be involved in their development for NDCS along with other patient, parent and carer groups, working together with a passionate group of professionals who work with children and adults born with atresia or microtia.

Download UK Care Standards for the Management of Patients with Microtia and Atresia (Edited by: Henderson, R., Moffat, C., Stewart, K., and Clapperton, K.) March 2015

For further information about microtia and atresia you can also order or download a free booklet on atresia and microtia written for families from NDCS here, contact Microtia UK or join the Microtia Mingle Facebook Group.

 

From this month NHS England (briefly known as the NHS Commissioning Board) takes over responsibility for commissioning specialist services for deaf children. This includes specialist implantable devices such as cochlear implants, bone anchored hearing aids and middle ear implants etc. Bilateral cochlear implants are currently and continue to be funded in line with NICE recommedations which children have a right to access under the NHS Constitution.

This month NHS England have announced their clinical access policies for bone anchored hearing aids and active middle ear implants. These are important because they relate to services that don’t have NICE recommendations and were previously commissioned locally by Primary Care Trusts and were subject to wide variation in provision. In summary:

Bone anchored hearing aids

  • are of safe and of proven benefit
  • should be provided in a specialist centre doing at least 15 a year. The team should include an ENT surgeon, audiologist, paediatric anaesthetist and speech and language therapist.
  • for children with microtia their care must be coordinated by a multidisciplinary team that can provide appropriate hearing and reconstructive support.
  • early intervention is vital and children born deaf should be provided with a bone anchored hearing aid on a soft headband until they are old enough for surgery.
  • funding will be available for children with bilateral conductive hearing loss to have bilateral bone anchored hearing aids if multidisciplinary assessment suggests that this would provide children with the best hearing environment in the classroom situation.
  • although bone anchored hearing aids would not normally be funded for children with unilateral deafness, an ‘exceptional case’ request can be made centred on information regarding the child’s development, audiometry results and communication needs.
  • and for the first time service providers will be expected to collect and provide audit data on request.

“Documents which have informed this policy – The National Deaf Children’s Society. Quality Standards in Bone Anchored Hearing Aids for Children and Young People. 2010″

Middle Ear Implants

Middle ear implants are a relatively new technology and very few children world-wide have been fitted with them. The evidence base is therefore almost non-existent at the current time. For these reasons it was not unexpected that active middle ear implants will not be routinely commissioned and will only be used as part of a recognised and structured clinical research project. However, they will be commissioned in the following limited circumstances:

  • Bilateral sensorineural hearing loss when conventional hearing aids have been used and found to be medically unsuitable due to conditions of the external ear.
  • Mixed hearing loss when conventional hearing aids have been used and found to be medically unsuitable due to conditions of the external ear and when a bone anchored hearing aid has been implanted and been associated with medical problems of the soft tissues or loss of fixture on more than one occasion.

One in 10 children who survive meningitis are deafened as a result of the illness. Great strides have been made in vaccination for some types of meningitis including the vaccination for Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) which was the biggest cause of meningitis in children under the age of 5 years and a major cause of deafness. The Hib vaccine was introduced in 1992 into the childhood vaccination schedule. However, even after this, hearing problems remain one of the most common after effects of bacterial meningitis.  Other forms of meningitis which are not vaccine preventable, and which pose a significant risk of hearing loss, are group B streptococcal and E coli meningitis, which together account for most cases of meningitis in newborn babies (neonatal meningitis). This means that health professionals working in paediatrics must remain vigilant and refer all babies and children who have had meningitis to audiology for hearing tests, and audiologists must continue to educate their local teams about the risks.

In November 2009 I spoke at the ‘After Meningitis Conference’ in London hosted by the Meningitis Trust on the ‘Impact and Challenges of Hearing Loss Following Meningitis’. I have uploaded the slides below for those that are interested in the facts and figures, and listed the references below.

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Resources, references & further information

A while back I blogged about a new NDCS weekend families with a child who has mild, moderate or unilateral deafness that I was involved in delivering. We are continuing to develop our famly weekend programme and are really delighted to announce a further two new ones…

You & your deaf child: a weekend for deaf parents & their families which will be held 30th November – 2nd December in Reading (for deaf children aged 2.5 – 11 years)

and Weekend for young people with acquired, progressive or late-onset deafness & their families (aged 11 – 16 years and who have developed their hearing loss in the last 18 months) from 18 – 20th January in Reading.

All events are free of charge! You can find out more about these events, other weekend events for families, and details on booking here.  And if you know of any families that these would be suitable for please pass on the information to them. Thank you!

Families who have a child with a mild, moderate or unilateral deafness frequently report that their child’s needs are poorly understood. This is often because the effect of their hearing loss may be more subtle than for those children with a more severe hearing loss. For example a mainstream teacher will find the child can hear them fine when working one-to-one with the child and not appreciate that the they can’t hear voices from further away and when there is background noise. This means that children have very reduced opportunities to benefit from hearing what is going on around them – incidental learning – and are therefore more likely to show delays in speech, language, educational, & social development than their normally hearing peers. Sadly, due to funding and capacity issues, local specialist support resources are often prioritised towards those children with more severe hearing losses so that training and awareness in schools may be low. Parents understanding and advocating for their child’s needs becomes even more important.
In 2010, NDCS was awarded a 2 year grant from the Department for Education under the SEN and Disability “Improving Outcomes” theme. We have been working with parents and professionals, providing specialist information and support on key barriers to achievement and to specific groups with a significant attainment gap. One strand of this work that I’ve been involved with has been to provide new information resources for parents that are available free to download – ‘Mild deafness’ and ‘Unilateral deafness’. This weekend I was involved in developing our first weekend for families of children who have a mild, moderate or unilateral deafness. All the deaf children were between 3 and 7 years old and they and their siblings appeared to have a great time occupied in the children’s activities sesssions. Parents attended sessions sharing their experiences, and heard from a young adult role model who grew up with moderate hearing loss in both ears. They also attended information sessions on audiology, technology, education, and NDCS events and services. 12 families attended and for 10 of them it was the first time they or their children had ever attended an NDCS event. Many had been told or held the perception that their child wasn’t ‘deaf enough’ to access specialist services, Disability Living Allowance, resources that help children develop listening skills, and even NDCS. A few families had shown an interest in learning sign language to help communication at times when their hearing aids couldn’t be used and to mix with other deaf children, but many had been poorly advised including that it would have a negative impact on their child’s spoken language development. This may have been one dimension of why families often hadn’t persued joining local groups and meeting other families with deaf children. Most of the children had never met another child that uses hearing aids and it was a real joy watching them playing together and making new friends ‘like them’ over the weekend. I believe the parents have all gone away feeling more confident that they understand their child’s needs and will be better able to make informed choices on behalf of and with their child.

So if you have a child with a mild, moderate or unilateral deafness remember that “NDCS uses the word ‘deaf’ to refer to all levels of hearing loss” and that all of our current services and events are open to you.

During the last year the NDCS Youth Advisory Board decided that the most important thing they wanted to improve was Deaf Awareness in schools. To read about the why’s and how’s have a look at one YAB member’s blog, but put simply “who better to tell other young people about the issues facing deaf young people than deaf young people themselves?!”

So for next weeks Deaf Awareness Week (7-13 May 2012) NDCS have launched a new campaign – Look, Smile, Chat to improve understanding of deafness among teenagers and help deaf and hearing teenagers to communicate with each other.

Look, Smile, Chat

Most deaf teenagers go to mainstream school and some of their classmates don’t know how to chat to them. Simple steps can make a big difference – click on the logo above for more information, where you’ll find free lesson plans, posters and films to support the campaign.

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