KidsAudiologist

Archive for the ‘hearing loops’ Category

Hearing aid wearers are most familiar with their ‘T’ switch to help them hear better in public places fitted with loop systems, such as churches, theatres, banks and post offices. These aren’t situations we generally consider as being very relevant to children and young people but a new generation of assistive devices have the potential to make hearing aids ‘cool’, improve their listening experience, and increase opportunities for language and social development.

Induction loop technology
Induction loop technology is the oldest of the wireless technologies and works with a telecoil, which has been a standard feature in NHS hearing aids for many years. Room loops help overcome some limitations of hearing aids and reduce the negative effects of distance and background noise, improving the signal-to-noise ratio and reducing listening effort for the wearer.

During the analogue era of hearing aids the telecoil was always available and a visual MTO switch meant that wearers were prompted to ask questions about it or go out and research it even if the audiologist didn’t directly tell them about it’s use. New and innovative products which use magnetic induction technology are making mainstream products more accessible to deaf children enabling them to share experiences with their hearing friends. These include inductive earhooks, neckloops and Bluetooth streamers with neckloops. These products allow a child wearing a hearing aid to listen to mobile phones or an entertainment device, such as an iPod, MP3 player, laptop or portable games console.

Modern digital hearing aids now have multiple programme capability but the telecoil setting must be activated. The wearer must be able to reliably change programmes as there is no visual indicator the ‘T’ setting is being used. Our experience at NDCS is that the majority of children and young people attending our events or visiting the Listening Bus do not know what the telecoil is and do not have it activated and so are unable to try out equipment that could be of benefit.

Deaf children and young people asking for more information
In 2007 NDCS carried out a consultation with nearly 1500 children and young people aged nine to 18. The results found significant numbers of children and young people in both the younger and older age groups wanted more information on deafness and the technologies that can support them.

Download the full article – Telecoils – making hearing aids cool for kids? – that was published in March 2013 in the UK edition of Audio Infos magazine to answer some common questions we get asked:

  • Using loop technology with children
  • Not deaf enough for a ‘T’ setting?
  • Too young for a ‘T’ setting?
  • Too hard explaining the technical information to a child?
  • Worried about noise interference?
  • T or M/T?
  • They already have an personal FM system. Isn’t that better?
  • I don’t feel confident recommending assistive listening products?

One more tool in their toolbox!
Loop technology has moved out of dusty meeting halls and has become very relevant to deaf children and young people. At the same time deaf children and young people are reporting that they need more information about both deaf and mainstream technologies and how they can access these. New technologies are making mainstream products more accessible to deaf children enabling them to enjoy the same communication, music, and entertainment devices as their hearing peers. Telecoils are one more tool for children, with the potential to enhance their language, educational and social development.

Further information

For information on the wide range of products and equipment that might be helpful for deaf children at home, at school or when socialising with friends, as well as information on the using the free Technology Test Drive to trial new equipment head to NDCS here.

Telecoils – making hearing aids cool for kids? (Audio Infos, Mar 2013)

Can Kids Benefit From Hearing Loops? (Jane Madell, Jan 2015)

 

 

 

 

 

 


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