KidsAudiologist

Archive for the ‘battery’ Category

How long a battery lasts depends on the type and power of hearing aid, how long it is worn each day, what kinds of situations the hearing aid is worn in (it’s processor has to work harder in noisier environments for example) and whether it is also supplying power to integrated FM or wireless FM receivers. Most children in the UK are issued with disposable batteries and many of them are using several hundred every year – wow! What are you doing with your used ones?

All used batteries should be disposed of safely and preferably recycled. Some audiology services will ask you to return old batteries when requesting new ones and they will recycle the old ones. It is good practice to keep your used batteries in the original packaging so that you can be sure that no old batteries have gone missing and to keep the batteries safe. If you are not asked to return old batteries you can safely dispose of them in your household rubbish. However, many local councils now have recycling schemes for batteries including household collection. Alternatively many large stores that sell batteries offer boxes to keep old batteries in and recycling schemes. For more informaton on recycling batteries in your area go to the Directgov website or visit Battery Back and type in your postcode to find the collection point nearest your home.

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Updated 29th December 2018 to include additional references

A recent study looked at 20 years worth of data from emergency departments in the USA about children who had attended following a battery related incident. Whilst incidents were rare at 4.6 hospital visits per 100,000 children in the population that amounted to an average 3289 visits annually. The study looked at four scenarios – swallowing batteries (which accounted for 76.6% of visits), and putting them in the mouth (7.5%), the ear canal (5.7%) and the nose (10.2%). And it was most likely to happen in the under 5’s (mean age 3.9 years). More than 8 out of 10 visits were related to button batteries which are widely used in hearing aids, cochlear implants and other electronic devices. It’s also worth considering that the magnets used in some cochlear implant coils are a similar size and shape to button batteries and could also be a potential hazard. This means that audiologists and parents of young deaf children need to be aware of the risks and ensure children’s equipment is used safely:

  • Make sure young children have childproof battery locks fitted to their hearing aids so that they can’t remove the battery themselves.
  • Try not to let young children see batteries being changed. It is safer if they do not know that the battery compartment opens.
  • Ensure both the used and new batteries are stored safely and out of sight of young children.
  • Keep your used batteries in the original packaging so that you can be sure that no old batteries have gone missing and to keep the batteries safe.
  • Remember that even if you trust your own child not to fiddle with their batteries there may be other children in their school or nursery who don’t understand that they shouldn’t play with them.

Fortunately the majority of battery related injuries aren’t serious and can be easily treated. But occasionally injuries are serious so it is important to follow up any concerns you may have immediately. If you are concerned that your child may have swallowed a battery or put one somewhere they shouldn’t – take them to your nearest A&E department. Take a similar battery and the packaging with you so that the hospital staff can identify the type of battery and know what action they need to take.

References:

Button Batteries Pose Dangers to Children, Advance for Speech-Language Pathologists & Audiologists [Published online December 2011]

George, A.T., & Motiwale, S. Magnet ingestion in children – a potentially sticky issue? The Lancet, Volume 379, Issue 9834, Pages 2341 – 2342, June 2012

Hearing Aids; Information for families, NDCS, January 2012

Sharpe, S.J., Rochette, L.M., & Smith, G.A. Pediatric Battery-Related Emergency Department Visits in the United States, 1990–2009, Pediatrics [Published online May 2012]

UK’s top paediatric doctors warn of devastating impact of button batteries, GOSH Sept 2016

Hearing aid battery compartments need locks, CHI+MED Making medical devices safer, 2016

Keeping children safe from button batteries during the festive season and beyond! PHE Dec 2018

 


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