KidsAudiologist

Funding for bone anchored hearing aids & middle ear implants

Posted on: April 19, 2013

From this month NHS England (briefly known as the NHS Commissioning Board) takes over responsibility for commissioning specialist services for deaf children. This includes specialist implantable devices such as cochlear implants, bone anchored hearing aids and middle ear implants etc. Bilateral cochlear implants are currently and continue to be funded in line with NICE recommedations which children have a right to access under the NHS Constitution.

This month NHS England have announced their clinical access policies for bone anchored hearing aids and active middle ear implants. These are important because they relate to services that don’t have NICE recommendations and were previously commissioned locally by Primary Care Trusts and were subject to wide variation in provision. In summary:

Bone anchored hearing aids

  • are of safe and of proven benefit
  • should be provided in a specialist centre doing at least 15 a year. The team should include an ENT surgeon, audiologist, paediatric anaesthetist and speech and language therapist.
  • for children with microtia their care must be coordinated by a multidisciplinary team that can provide appropriate hearing and reconstructive support.
  • early intervention is vital and children born deaf should be provided with a bone anchored hearing aid on a soft headband until they are old enough for surgery.
  • funding will be available for children with bilateral conductive hearing loss to have bilateral bone anchored hearing aids if multidisciplinary assessment suggests that this would provide children with the best hearing environment in the classroom situation.
  • although bone anchored hearing aids would not normally be funded for children with unilateral deafness, an ‘exceptional case’ request can be made centred on information regarding the child’s development, audiometry results and communication needs.
  • and for the first time service providers will be expected to collect and provide audit data on request.

“Documents which have informed this policy – The National Deaf Children’s Society. Quality Standards in Bone Anchored Hearing Aids for Children and Young People. 2010″

Middle Ear Implants

Middle ear implants are a relatively new technology and very few children world-wide have been fitted with them. The evidence base is therefore almost non-existent at the current time. For these reasons it was not unexpected that active middle ear implants will not be routinely commissioned and will only be used as part of a recognised and structured clinical research project. However, they will be commissioned in the following limited circumstances:

  • Bilateral sensorineural hearing loss when conventional hearing aids have been used and found to be medically unsuitable due to conditions of the external ear.
  • Mixed hearing loss when conventional hearing aids have been used and found to be medically unsuitable due to conditions of the external ear and when a bone anchored hearing aid has been implanted and been associated with medical problems of the soft tissues or loss of fixture on more than one occasion.
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